wildernet

Hiking & Walking: Colorado > White River National Forest > Aspen Ranger District

Quick Facts

Maroon-Snowmass Trail (from Snowmass Creek Trailhead)

Average Time: 2 - 3 Days
Beginning Elevation: 8,400 Feet (2618.5 Meters)
Difficulty: Difficult
Elevation Gain: 2,500 Feet (779.3 Meters)
Ending Elevation: 11,000 Feet (3428.9 Meters)
Length: 7.3 Miles (11.7 Kilometers)
Other Elevation: 12,462 Feet (3884.7 Meters) at Buckskin Pass
Other Elevation: 10,980 Feet (3422.7 Meters) at Snowmass Lake
Other Maps: Trails Illustrated 128 Maroon Bells, Redstone, and Marble
Pets: Yes - Leashed
Recommended Season: Summer to Fall
Trail Number: 1,975
Usage: Heavy
USGS Maps: Maroon Bells, Snowmass Mtn, Capitol Peak




Satellite and Topo Map




General Description

Horse packers glide across Snowmass Lake
Copyright: USDA Forest Service
Horse packers glide across Snowmass Lake
This trail is one of the most heavily used trails in the Aspen area. Hikers, backpackers and horse travelers enjoy the wildflowers, views and access to other areas within the Wilderness. Camping at Crater Lake (designated sites only) and Snowmass Lake can get very crowded.

This trail description starts at Snowmass Falls Ranch following a road that turns into a single track. In a little over 1 mile the trail forks, stay left (right goes to West Snowmass Trail). The trail ascends to the east side of the Snowmass Creek for about 6 miles. The trail continues to the left of a large beaver pond and shortly crosses a second beaver pond via a large log jam. The trail continues (south) on the other side ascending several switchbacks then entering forest. About 1/4 mile before Snowmass Lake the trail forks, take the left fork to continue on the Maroon-Snowmass trail or find the group and fire sites area (the right goes to Snowmass Lake). Continue past the group sites to another trail junction. Stay left, the trail descends through forest and crosses Snowmass Creek via a ford. The trail ascends into the valley and begins a steep ascend to Buckskin Pass. From the top of Buckskin Pass the trail switchbacks down to the junction with the Willow Lake Trail. Take the right fork to continue on the Maroon-Snowmass Trail. The trail descends through Minnehaha Gulch to the junction for Crater Lake. At the Crater Lake bulletin board take the left fork. The trail continues to descend to Maroon Lake.

Directions from Aspen: Drive 4.7 miles west of Aspen on Highway 82 and turn left onto Brush Creek Road. Follow Brush Creek Road 4.8 miles and turn right onto Divide Road. The road passes the Krabloonik Restaurant at 10.3 miles, and descends steeply before reaching a fork. Continue straight to the end of the road (Passing the East Snowmass Trail at 11.9 miles on the left.) where there is parking (12.1 miles).

Seasonal Information:
Normally Accessible: June through September (NOTE: Due to snow at high elevations the trail may be inaccessible in Early June and Late September.) .



Current Conditions & Trip Reports
Winter Conditions. Beware of avalanche danger and hypothermia. Updated: 2002-12-23 14:37:00.0


Add your own trip Report! Newly re-released feature. One of the most popular features on Wildernet, trip reports allow you to share your experiences with others. This is an invaluable resource for determining what to expect on your outdoor adventure, so please participate! To prevent spamming, you must be a registered user of Wildernet in order to submit a trip report

No trip reports filed to date. Please be the first one to do so!



Recreation Opportunities
Activity Remarks On Site
ICON Backpacking Around Crater Lake and Snowmass Lake, camp in designated spots only .
Yes
ICON Cold Water Fishing Snowmass Lake, Willow Lake, Crater Lake
Yes
ICON Hiking & Walking Maroon-Snowmass Trail (from Snowmass Creek Trailhead)
Yes
ICON Horseback Riding Maroon-Snowmass Trail
Yes
ICON Viewing Scenery This trail passes through spectacular mountain scenery.
Yes



Related Activities
Brush Creek Road - Brush Creek Road leads travelers from Highway 82, west of Aspen, to Snowmass Ski Area. Its a good starting point for many recreation opportunities.



Powered by Wildernet.com
Disclaimer and User Agreement